Alcohol Ads Linked to Drinking Behavior

Another scientific study has given the alcohol industry proof that their huge advertising budgets are indeed paying off. The more ads people see, the more they drink Cornell University research has confirmed. The more alcohol ads someone was exposed to, the study determined, the more likely they were to report consuming at least one alcoholic drink in the previous month. And among drinkers, exposure to more ads correlated to consuming more drinks.

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Study: A.A. Most Effective Path to Sobriety

Alcoholics Anonymous, the worldwide fellowship of sobriety seekers, is the most effective path to abstinence, according to a comprehensive analysis of studies of more than 10,000 participants conducted by a Stanford School of Medicine researcher and his collaborators.

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Alcohol Ads Should Be More Regulated

The marketing of alcoholic beverages is one cause of underage drinking, public health experts conclude. Because of this, countries should abandon what are often piecemeal and voluntary codes to restrict alcohol marketing and construct government-enforced laws designed to limit alcohol-marketing exposure and message appeal to youth. These conclusions stem form a series of eight review articles which synthesized the results of 163 studies on alcohol advertising and youth alcohol consumption.

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Older Women Drink More and Think It's 'Normal'

Women aged 50-70 are more likely than younger women to consume alcohol at levels that exceed low risk drinking guidelines - and most think that's just perfectly fine. Research has found that despite the potential health risks of exceeding national drinking guidelines, many middle-aged and older women who consume alcohol at high risk levels tend to perceive their drinking as normal and acceptable, so long as they appear respectable and in control.

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Alcopops Remain a Danger for Young Drinkers

Supersized alcopops pose unique risks to young drinkers, despite new serving size labels mandated by the Federal Trade Commission, according to two new research studies. Supersized alcopops--such as Four Loko--are sugar-sweetened beverages with as much as 14 percent alcohol-by-volume (abv) or 5.5 standard alcoholic drinks in one 23.5 oz. can.

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Excessive Drinking a Burden to Taxpayers

The total harm caused by excessive alcohol consumption is a staggering $2.05 per drink in the United States, and, of this, the government ends up paying about 80 cents per drink. However, the federal government and states only bring in about 21 cents per drink on average in alcohol taxes, according to new research in the Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs. This leaves the majority of the cost of alcohol's harms borne by those who don't drink excessively or who don't drink at all.

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Even Low-level Alcohol Use Increases Miscarriage Risk

Women who consume alcohol during pregnancy — even in small amounts — have a 19 percent greater risk of miscarriage than women who don't use alcohol, according to a new study by Vanderbilt researchers. The study also found that for alcohol exposure of less than five drinks per week, each additional drink per week during pregnancy was associated with a 6 percent increase in miscarriage risk.

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Seeing Greenery Can Reduce Cravings

Being able to see green spaces from your home is associated with reduced cravings for alcohol, cigarettes and harmful foods, new research has shown. The study, led by the University of Plymouth, is the first to demonstrate that passive exposure to nearby greenspace is linked to both lower frequencies and strengths of craving.

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