Alcoholism

ACOAs More Likely to Marry Alcoholics

Children of parents who have alcohol use disorder are more likely to get married under the age of 25, less likely to get married later in life, and more likely to marry a person who has alcohol use disorder themselves, according to a new study by researchers at Virginia Commonwealth University and Lund University in Sweden.

Continue reading

Early Brain Injury Linked to Alcoholism

Researchers at Ohio State University have surveyed previous studies to investigate the relationship between traumatic brain injuries and alcohol abuse. They found evidence that traumatic brain injuries in children and adolescents could be a risk-factor for alcohol abuse in later life.

Continue reading

Heavy Drinkers Have Poor Dietary Habits

Excessive drinking and an unbalanced diet are two preventable contributors to health problems in the developed world. Different studies have found varying linkages between amounts of alcohol consumed and quality of diet. A study of adults in Spain has found that heavy drinking, binge drinking, a preference for spirits, and drinking alcohol at mealtimes were associated with a poor adherence to major food consumption guidelines.

Continue reading

Parental Alcoholism Linked to Offspring's Alcoholism

Researchers know that there is a strong link between parental alcohol use disorders and the risk for developing an alcohol use disorders among their offspring. This study looked at the risk of alcohol use disorders in the offspring of a large population-based sample of Danish parents. Findings confirmed that parental alcohol use disorders were associated with an increased risk of alcohol use disorders among the offspring.

Continue reading

Spirituality of A.A. Is Effective

Addictions, whether it is to drugs or alcohol, are a very difficult hurdle for individuals to overcome. But, there are ways to help people with their recovery through 12-step programs like Alcoholics Anonymous (AA). Many of these organizations, including AA, highlight spirituality as a very important factor, but the data surrounding its effectiveness have often been contested.

Continue reading

Stress Hormone Impacts Alcohol Recovery

Scientists at the University of Liverpool have found that high levels of a stress hormone in recovering alcoholics could increase the risk of relapse. The study showed that cortisol, a hormone produced by the adrenal gland in response to stress, is found in high levels in chronic alcoholics, as well as those recovering from the condition. Researchers found that this could result in impaired memory, attention and decision-making functions, which could decrease the patient's ability to engage with treatment.

Continue reading

Heavy Alcohol Use Hikes Risk of Pancreatic Cancer

Heavy alcohol use and binge drinking could increase the risk of pancreatic cancer in men, research from UT Southwestern Medical Center suggests. In a study available online in Cancer Causes and Control, researchers found that the more alcohol a man consumed, the higher his risk of pancreatic cancer compared with those who drank little or no alcohol.

Continue reading



Page top